Queensland

Works start on new Noosa crossing—Mary River Road Bridge

Construction is getting underway on the new Mary River Road Bridge at Cooroy in central Queensland, which is set to improve safety and future-proof access to Cooroy for decades to come.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Michael McCormack said the new bridge would be significantly safer than the structure it replaces.

“The new Mary River Road Bridge will improve community access and will be significantly safer than the old bridge, delivering two new lanes with wider shoulders and barrier rails to address risky driver behaviour,” Mr McCormack said.

“This project is a great example of how the Government’s Bridges Renewal Program is delivering better access and safer bridges for local communities.”

Federal Member for Wide Bay Llew O’Brien said the bridge would have a higher load limit, allowing increased freight and passenger traffic to meet Cooroy’s economic requirements for the next century.

“The new bridge will be able to bear 160 tonnes, an increase on the current limit of 15 tonnes,” Mr O’Brien said.

“The stronger bridge will keep up with growing demand and support Cooroy’s economy for the next 100 years.”

Noosa Council Mayor Tony Wellington said the new bridge will increase safety and accessibility.

“The new concrete bridge will support dedicated bicycle lanes, shared pedestrian pathways and better access to local sporting facilities,” Cr Wellington said.

“We appreciate the community’s patience while work is underway to build this new bridge.”

During construction, a detour will be in place for motorists via Emerald Street, Garnet Street and Sportsground Parade. Pedestrians can walk via Mill Place and Lower Mill Road or through Apex Park and Cooroy sporting complex.

The Mary River Road Bridge Replacement is jointly funded by the Australian Government and Noosa Council, with the Australian Government contributing $663,429 towards the project through its Bridges Renewal Program.

Works start on 2 July 2018 and are expected to be completed by late 2018, weather permitting.

Source: Australian Government