Western Australia

10-year plan for Wheatbelt’s parks and reserves released

Great Western Woodlands stock image

Public comment is being sought on a new 10-year management plan proposed for more than a million hectares of parks and reserves in the Wheatbelt region.

The proposed plan covers 728 existing reserves of natural vegetation and is bounded by Dalwallinu, Cranbrook, Ongerup, York, Wandering, Darkan, Yellowdine and Lake King.

The reserves include valuable conservation areas such as Dryandra Woodland which is home to Western Australia’s mammal emblem, the numbat.

Almost half of the reserves are less than 100 hectares. The two largest reserves, Karroun Hill and Jilbadji nature reserves within the Great Western Woodlands, together make up more than half a million hectares.

The WA Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions has prepared the proposed management plan on behalf of the Conservation and Parks Commission.

Public comment for the draft management plan is open until April 5, 2019.

Source: WA Government